How To

Tricky folds often require strange fractions, there are many techniques for achieving these.

Thirds

Fifths

Sevenths

8 thoughts on “How To

    1. you have right triangles and you basically use cosine to determine the length and then you could take that length and dived the full side of the paper and from that if you get whatever you wanted great. e.g. cos(78.75degrees)… (45+22.5+11.25) is .195 very close to .2 or 1/5.

  1. Thirds:
    If you plot the lines in a xy-plane, the x value is simply 1/3 (assuming that the sides of the square = 1.

    Fifth:
    Sorta the same thing. If you plot the lines out with the last one being at 11.25 degrees, it will just happen to go through (1/5,1)

    Seventh:
    I have no idea who figured this one out, but again, plot a line out to (1,1/7) and figure it out.

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