926: Tiger, tiger, burning bright

There are lots of origami tigers – few actually look like tigers – you know, the stripey thing. This model is radically different:

Using a HUGE square (I hand-made a large piece of double tissue – black and yellow), you start with a birdbase, then torture the paper for 2 days to create a pleated ruffle either side of the back ridge that is then zig-zagged to reveal colour slices that become the tiger stripes.

This model is really really intense – it took me ages to even work out what half the folds mean, let alone how to achieve them. Thankfully the double tissue was thin and terrifically strong, so it withstood the torture unscathed. Continue reading

821: (271/365) Satoshi Kamiya’s Ant

After re-subscribing to JOAS, in record time my back-issues of the Tanteidan magazine arrived and along with one of them, a really challenging diagram:

About 170 steps, extreme paper torture and, as a project, something truly terrifying but I knew I needed to try it. Continue reading

703: (153/365) Square Twist Tessellation

Assignment time can sometimes be boring for a teacher, especially when kids are beavering away independently:

This is a tessellation I have not tried before. Based on a square grid, diagonal squares rotate 45 degrees to lie flat again, causing pleat ripples that are cancelled out by adjacent twists – clever. Continue reading

640: (90/365) Stellated Rhombic Dodecahedron

Now I for one like stellated geometry – taking regular solids and adding pointy things is very satisfying:

The pointy things on this solid are rhomboid – so not strictly regular pyramidal but 4-sided none the less. Continue reading

Stellated Washi Icosahedron

When friends travel, often they find lovely small bits of Washi. Packs of this are full of a myriad of lovely traditional prints, rich colours often embossed and overlayed with gold.

The tricksey bit is to work out what to do with it – given it’s size and often the overpowering beauty of the design.icosahedron Continue reading