1007: The Difference Between a Duck…

I am reminded of a joke, oft told by my Father In law: “What’s the difference between a duck? … Nothing … One leg is both the same”:

A duck

In looking to start some recreational folding I remembered a model from Wei Lin Chen I found ages ago but had not gotten around to until now.

Continue reading

936: Naomiki Sato’s Hummingbirds

Cruising around on Fakebook, as one does, I can across a photodiagram series from Naomiki Sato:

Lovely little hummingbirds, folded from 15cm square patterned paper, from bird bases.

I discovered he published a variation also, so thought I could give that a try. I think I like the wider tail one better, but they are both so cute. I have yet to see an actual hummingbird so have no real idea how morphologically accurate this is. Continue reading

933: David Brill’s “Robin”

I have been a fan of David Brill’s designs ever since I read his book “Brilliant Origami”. Such a lovely touch, breathing life into paper:

This Robin is delightful – I saw hand-drawn diagrams on David’s website and then professionally drawn diagrams in the latest Tanteidan Magazine and knew I needed to try it. I particularly like the free-form nature of the hand-drawn version, making it a bit more of an adventure to fold this bird.

The shape, management of colour change and general model stability is wonderful in this model. There is nice sense of volume, beautiful 3D head, and an animated pose. The subtleties in fold here are such that I found all 5 of them (yes, I got a bit carried away) are all slightly different, making almost a family grouping. Continue reading

901: (351/365) Little Bird

On my “must fold” for some time has been this design bu Hideo Komatso:

Entitled “little bird”, I folded it in black to make an obese crow. A deliciously complex fold that ends up being a 3d representation of a robin-like bird. Continue reading

889: (339/365) Sitting Duck

There has been a lot of talk in the media about people demonstrably doing the wrong thing, over a really long period of time. Interesting that one of the defences offered was that they were a “sitting duck” in the post-weinstein era. Regardless, a backyard should be a safe place to play:

This is Henry Pham’s “Little Duck” – a charming model I watched a video about before folding it. Continue reading

850: (300/365) …and now the Penguin on your television set will explode.

…how’d he know that then?

Being a fan of Monty Python, I find quotes emerge everywhere. What better to celebrate 300 models than a lovely little penguin:

Designed by Jun Maekawa, I am amazed I have never folded this little cutie before, such a nice shape and, with presentation paper it would be a great display piece. Continue reading

846: (296/365) Peacock 1

I gotta learn to be more careful, the previous post (which I removed the number from) turned out to be a refold from my first 365 (years ago) that I had forgotten about (I got the fold sequence from somewhere else and did not twig to the duplication … so sue me 😛 ) Fortunately a follower pointed this out:

This is Jun Maewawa’s “Peacock 1” – a lovely exercise in Miura Ori corrugation folding for the tail and some interesting layer management to form legs and head among it. Continue reading

834: (284/365) Swallow

I know, I am behind, but have been inexplicably tired of late, time to catch up:

This is a swallow, or more correctly a mud lark, but is a fun fold from DOT1 that I was going to try. Continue reading

826: (276/365) Pelican

What a wonderful bird is a Pelican, whose beak can hold more than it’s belly can:

We saw lots of pelicans when on holiday up the mid-north coast in the holidays just ended. Majestic gregarious birds that seem to be an odd sum of parts. Continue reading

823: (273/365) Owl

Cruising through my copy of Drawing Origami (Tome 1), I noticed a bunch of folds from there that I had not yet tried:

This little fellow is a bi-colour owl designed by Juan Hibou. Owls seem popular in origami design and this one cleverly manages layers and colours. Continue reading

813: (263/365) Llook out, there are Llamas!

PART 2: THE LLAMA, LIVE FROM GOLDERS GREEN
The llama is a quadruped
which lives in big rivers like the Amazon.

It has two ears,
a heart,
a forehead,
and a beak for eating honey,
but it is provided with fins for swimming.
Llamas are bigger than frogs. Continue reading

803: (253/365) Roman Diaz’s Owl

There are many approaches to folding owls, all concentrate on the eyes and head structure:

This fold takes you on quite a ride. Diagrams taken from “Drawing Origami Tome 1”, the folding sequence is clear and rich, but I am sure my next fold of this model will be better as I now know what becomes what.  Continue reading

786: (236/365) Beth Johnson’s Hex Owl

I cannot believe I have not tried this before:

A lovely hexagonal tessellation in one corner of a hexagon becomes the fluffy tummy, collapsing the body makes for lovely eyes and a pair of crenellated wings. Continue reading

754: (204/365) Gaff’s Blade Runner Chicken

My top 5 movies of all time includes the Sci-Fi classic “Blade Runner”. A couple of times during the movie, to confirm a character’s opinion of Deckard’s actions, his sidekick “Gaf” left an origami figure:

One was actually folded by the actor (Edward James Olmos) – a gum wrapper was fashioned into a Chicken. He said he did this as a way of staying in the scene without pulling focus, apparently the Director, Ridley Scott, noticed it and included it in the scene to counterpoint the main characters reluctance to get himself into danger, which later he does anyway. Continue reading

741: (191/365) Hummingbird

Not sure if Australia has any native species of Hummingbird:

Some “sunbirds” look similar but are not closely related species. Continue reading

738: (188/365) Ya Goose!

So it is late, and I am tired, but sometimes I am a silly goose:

So what is a goose – long neck, beak, webbed beat, stocky body – this model ticks all the boxes. Continue reading

737: (187/365) Penguin

Reading through Origami Bygota, I stumbled across Ma Yong’s charming penguin:

Clever use of colour change goes part way to defining a penguin, but proportions and general morphology also helps. Continue reading

723: (173/365) Feathered Tsuru

Few would argue that the Tsuru (crane) is the quintessential origami figure. Everybody starts there, the form is so familiar and the skills necessary to fold it form the backbone of so many models:

While I have tried many variations of this model, few compare to Riccardo Foschi’s “feathered Tsuru”, a glorious and complex variation with such beautiful wings. Continue reading

719: (169/365) Jason Ku’s Duck

If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck and looks like a duck, it probably is a duck:

This is an intense little model that eats paper like few others. The body is heavy and shaping I found difficult because of the many layers. Continue reading

709: (159/365) Satoshi Kamiya’s Tsuru Rose

I am nothing if not determined at times. This  model has beaten me many times but, due to a perfect storm it seemed to just happen in my hands:

This is Satoshi Kamiya’s “Tsuru Rose” – an odd but beautiful combination of a Kawasaki rose twist in the body segment of a traditional Tsuru. Continue reading