970: Siren

…so I decided it was time to play a game of WTF (What’s That Fold?) on fakebook, and discovered from my archives this was the 29th such game:

Chen Xiou's Mermaid test fold

Through a series of gradual fold sequence reveals, punters guess, and eventually they got it. This is “Sirene” (or Mermaid) from the soon to be published book by Chen Xiao.

This is my first “anime” style character work (stylised faces, detailed hair, cartoony pose) and it was a bit torturous at this scale, with this paper. Folding the shoulders and central body is tough work on small paper (I used 35cm duo white/natural Ikea Kraft paper).

In the end it is a charming model with lots of details, a diva in a “D” cup with bangs, lovely long hair and a beautiful tail. The fold sequence relies on really accurate pre-folding as errors tend to amplify the further through the fold you get. As a result of a 0.5mm inaccuracy in the first 10 steps, her bra is asymmetrical, and the more I tried to fix it, the odder the breast appeared.

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938: Angelfish by John Montroll

As a member of Origami USA, I get access to publications, diagrams and a community of folders world wide. It and JOAS are important communities for folders from Oz as we are so far (physically) from everywhere:

Every year, OUSA decorate a Christmas Tree at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. members are asked to contribute models to hang. Continue reading

931: Sipho Mabona’s Fugu

I have had this model on my “to do” list for ages – I had shied away from it because of what I perceived was a brutal precreasing sequence and impossible collapse:

That said, with a little large scale and some accurate pre-forming, the laying of the corrugations was fairly straightforward – all based on halves. Laying crenelations across these were fiddly in low light, and had I realised they would be angle bisecting squares later then I think I could have been more accurate. Continue reading

906: (356/365) Top of the Food Chain

As custodians of this planet, we do a pretty lousy job overall at looking after it. We see apex predators as threats and demonise them for acting naturally in their own domain:

In Australia, we employ shark nets which each year kill more OTHER things things than keep out sharks – time to think more about our place in this complex ecosystem. It is heartening to see activist groups like Sea Shepherds and Greenpeace actively working to change peoples perspectives but our News and media have much to learn about this – headlines are seductive but rarely paint a balanced or objective picture. Continue reading

900: (350/365) Calamari

I stumbled across a “dollar fold” designed by Daniel Brown and decided to try it:

An interesting exercise in sinking, point isolation and layer management, this charming squid looks fresh enough to cook. Continue reading

868: (318/365) Memory Like A Goldfish

It is a commonly held belief that Goldfish have a short-lived memory:

I have no idea if this is true, but suspect it is complete bunk. Continue reading

831: (281/365) Swimming Fishie

Perusing my copy of Tanteidan Magazine #163, I came across a cute 2-part model that I thought I should try:

Using orange for the fish and blue for the waves seemed to make sense at the time. Continue reading

815: (265/365) Pez 3

Browsing through Eduardo Clemente’s “Papiroflexia”, I am amazed at how prolific a designer he was, and how many variations on models he published:

This is Pez#3 – a rather handsome fish with lovely colour changes. Continue reading

813: (263/365) Llook out, there are Llamas!

PART 2: THE LLAMA, LIVE FROM GOLDERS GREEN
The llama is a quadruped
which lives in big rivers like the Amazon.

It has two ears,
a heart,
a forehead,
and a beak for eating honey,
but it is provided with fins for swimming.
Llamas are bigger than frogs. Continue reading

810: (260/365) Pez

In catch-up mode, this is Eduardo Clement’s “Pez”:

A delightful fish fold that is designed for paper that is the same colour both sides. A charming fold from his book Papiroflexia.

relevant because we recently spent time on the waters of Hervey Bay (yes, we did see whales, but yeah)

752: (202/365) Riccardo Foschi’s Koi

It was late, I was tired and I must admit to going to bed before folding yesterday. Full week, new levels of fatigue:

I found these diagrams on Pinterest – seems they are test diagrams (oops, sorry) but I love the shape and model structure. Continue reading

736: (186/365) Stoopid Monkey!

Australian politicians are a weird lot. Not “American” (shoot first then barbeque something) weird, just an odd lurch from crisis to crisis and stab your mate in the back for a shot at leadership kind of weird:

A recently deposed Prime Minister (Mr Tony Abott) is being a bit of an arse clown in the media, white-anting his own party and providing gifts for our hapless opposition in terms of instability and leaks. Continue reading

735: (185/365) Flipper!

What’s that Flipper? Timmy has fallen out of his boat and is surrounded by sharks? You get the coastguard and I will get the anti-shark spray:

An irrational tale of a Dolphin and his stupid pet human. I do not know about you but I grew up on cheesy American telly – Flipper, Brady Bunch, I Dream of Jeanie, The Munsters… all those shows now on high rotation on the dozens of cable channels that you flip through looking for something that is actually watchable. Continue reading

658: (108/365) Yoshizawa’s Goldfish

Few origami masters did more for modern origami than Yoshizawa Sensei:

With delightfully few folds, his models evoke shapes, creatures and personalities. Continue reading

617: (67/365) Narwal

There is a mystical beast called a Narwal – the unicorn of the sea:

I am lead to believe this is a real critter, and their nose horn seems (at least from photos I fond on Google) to be impractically long but there you go – evolution is an odd natural force. Continue reading

575: (25/365) A Cautionary Tale (Part 3)

Look away, look away … we are going to need a bigger boat:

Interestingly, people’s opinions of sharks in Australia, particularly by those who do not live here, varies from reality markedly. One would believe, if one believed what you see in the media, that sharks are a problem, everyone gets attacked – this is far from the truth.

Although this is a stereotypical tale of woe, I was interested in the folding sequence as each of the tree parts use different bases, wildly different techniques initially and yet there is consistency when you get to the final shaping. Continue reading

574: (24/365) A Cautionary Tale (Part 2)

…you went in, the water was fine. You notice a nice fishy, it seems to want to be friends:

This is part 2 of a series by Fernando Gilgado, again, like part 1 it uses bicolour paper and clever colour changes to highlight details. Continue reading

573: (23/365) A Cautionary Tale (Part 1)

It is a beautiful day, waters clear, the water beckons, it would be wrong not to go for a swim. You put your toe in, the water is lovely, swimming gives you a new found freedom:

This is part 1 of a 3 part story – what could possibly go wrong- we rarely see the danger, far off in the distance, and why would we consider it, we are ok, nothing could go wrong. Continue reading

565: (15/365) Golden Carp

Leafing through “Folding Australia 2016”, the Sydney Origami Society Convention book (in which I have a model published :)) I came across a cute little carp designed by Mindaugas Cesnavicius:

An ingenious design based on the pony base that teases lovely eyes and mouth, fins and a tail while managing the colour changes beautifully. Continue reading

548: Making Your Dollar Go Further

My son and his partner (Hi Matt and Alix!) came back from a recent trip to Canada and the US and had some greenbacks left over in their wallet.548moneyturtle

They are paper, you can fold them, there is a whole branch of Origami that does this intensively, led by artists like Won Park.

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