953: Nollentonk

My second test fold from a book by Tetsuya Gotani, this time a “Nollentonk”:

nollentonk

I say “Nollentonk”, only because my sister, when young, used to call elephants nollentonks – not sure why.

nollentonk views

This lovely folding sequence carefully hides white right until the emergence of the tusks via a clever colour change. The morphology of the model emerges as distinctly elephantine fairly early on and some of the moves that isolate features are delicious.

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951: Trike

The remnants of a pack of Daiso washi was sitting in my cupboard and i am not sure, so I start folding Fumiaki Kawahata’s Triceratops (from Origami Tanteidan Magazine 57) and realised why it was unused:

triceratops by Fumiaki Kawahata (Origami Tanteidan Magazine 57)

You assume that paper is square, and start folding, only to discover in some dimensions it is really not square, but you persist none the less, kludging landmarks as you go.

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946: Regenbogen by Maria Vahrusheva

As part of the Sydney Origami group’s weekly challenge, we were tasked with a modular:

946: Regenbogen by MariaVahrusheva

This is Regenbogen, designed by Maria Vahrusheva, described in the following Youtube tutorial video

The units (you need 30 for a ball of this configuration) are quite easy to fold (I managed to teach them to my Pastoral Care group kids – their version of this fold is still a work in progress … yes, I have folded nearly 2 of these now) and luckily (for boys at least) consists of mostly folding in half – something most people can do.

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908: (358/365) ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas …

…and all through the house, not a creature was stirring, except for a mouse:

Prep for festivities is always fun. Family feast tomorrow, lots to do. I hope you and your families enjoy the prep time as much as the day itself. Continue reading

903: (353/365) Slippery Little Sucker

I must admit to being a bit of a fanboy when it comes to the works of Satoshi Kamiya. His designs are genius, fabulously complicated to fold and make good use of the sheet:

This is his Octopus – an amazing fold from an octagon that yields lovely little legs, a beady set of eyes and a pendulous 3D head/body with a modicum of paper torture. Continue reading

885: (335/365) Trefoil Knot

In topology, a branch of mathematics, the trefoil knot is the simplest example of a nontrivial knot:

This is Kevin Hutson’s design, well CP really, that I sort of just nutted out after mis-folding it 4 times and uttering some bad words (sorry Mum). The observant amongst you will notice that it starts and finishes at the same point – like a mobiius strip on acid. Continue reading

884: (334/365) Pegasus

In my list of “models to try someday” was this model designed by Takashi Hojyo:

A complex management of points, this lovely rendition of a Pegasus has much to love. The wings, legs and general morphology are very pleasing to the eye but not easy to achieve as a fold. Continue reading

844: (294/365) Our House, is a very very very fine house …

It seems to be the season for buying houses. A couple of my work colleagues have, individually, in the last little while purchased houses:

The “Great Australian Dream” apparently is to own your own home – this seems irrefutable proof that it is still entirely possible. Continue reading

786: (236/365) Beth Johnson’s Hex Owl

I cannot believe I have not tried this before:

A lovely hexagonal tessellation in one corner of a hexagon becomes the fluffy tummy, collapsing the body makes for lovely eyes and a pair of crenellated wings. Continue reading

782: (232/365) Wedge Flex

Topologically convoluted geometric modulars confuse the brain – shapes that morph into different shapes in stable but seemingly unpredictable ways are fascinating:

This is a wedge-flex – a modular hinged construction of a series of triangular prisms (wedges) that fold, bend, twist and re-align in interesting configurations. Continue reading